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Guide to choosing online hearing aids

In the sea of options, we’ll identify top-quality companies and help you choose based on the most important considerations.

Last Updated: Feb 25, 2022
Choosing Online Hearing Aids

Maybe you’re here because you’re having trouble hearing. Or maybe your family has been insisting that you’re having trouble hearing. Or maybe you’re that family member trying to fortify yourself with handy information in order to convince a loved one that it’s time to take action.

No matter which of these describes your situation, there are so many hearing aid options out there that it can be hard to identify the path that’s right for you or your loved one. Should you buy online or in person? In the ear or behind the ear? With a telecoil or without?

We’ll break everything down for you and provide you with the information you need to answer these and many other questions. In the end, you’ll be able to identify and seek your ideal hearing aids with confidence.

Factors to consider when buying a hearing aid

There are many different factors that should play into your hearing aid decision. Here are the basics. Each of the factors listed here we discuss in greater detail below.

Degree of hearing loss

Hearing loss can range from mild to profound, depending on how loud you need things to be before you can hear them. Since certain hearing aids are better for different degrees of hearing loss – and for hearing loss at various frequencies – you should perform a hearing test before purchasing hearing aids. You do this either with an audiologist or using one of the many online hearing test options, which we discuss in our separate guide.

Budget

Particularly with the advent of direct-to-consumer companies, you now have a range of price points available, from a few hundred dollars to over $5,000. Generally, the least expensive options are sold online, with the most expensive sold at hearing aid centers.

Online vs. in-person purchase

Not too long ago, your only option to purchase hearing aids was through an audiologist or hearing aid center. Now, however, you can also purchase hearing aids directly online, without ever having to set foot in an office. Purchasing direct-to-consumer hearing aids can save time, money, and hassle, but it usually means less customization and less access to certain brands.

Types of hearing aid

There are many different styles of hearing aid, depending on where the component parts sit in relation to your ear. Some hearing aids sit entirely in your inner ear, so that they are practically invisible. Others are entirely behind your ear. And others are partially inside your ear and partly behind it. Different styles have different advantages and address different hearing needs.

Environmental and lifestyle factors

Even if two hearing aids look and function exactly the same, there still may be important features that set them apart in terms of how you live your life with them. Rechargeable hearing aids, for instance, are a much more eco-friendly option than ones that require you to constantly replace batteries, but they may limit how long you can be away from electricity on your camping trip.

Audio quality technology

Depending on the degree of hearing loss and how that loss manifests itself, you may require different technological requirements focused on audio quality. If you suffer from tinnitus, for instance, you may look for hearing aids that specifically offer tinnitus relief.

Advanced features

Even when the technology regarding audio quality is the same, hearing aids may have non-essential “bells and whistles” that make your life easier, such as a Bluetooth connection, rechargeable batteries, and telecoil technology.

In considering these factors, we won’t be discussing PSAPSs (personal sound amplification products), which are different from hearing aids. Unlike hearing aids, which distinguish between different types of sound and are often customized to your particular hearing needs, PSAPs only amplify sound, that is, they make all sounds louder indiscriminately. PSAPs are available over-the-counter without a hearing test or prescription and are not meant to be worn all the time. We will also not be discussing surgical procedures like cochlear implants.

Jump to:

Degree of hearing loss
Budget
Buying in person vs. online
Types of hearing aids
Environmental and lifestyle factors
Audio Technology
Other advanced features
Comparing hearing aid features
Budget hearing aids
Online Hearing Aids Between $1000 and $3000
Why you should trust us

Degree of hearing loss

The first step in choosing a hearing aid is to figure out the severity of your hearing loss. There are now several websites and apps that can test your hearing for free, and we invite you to check out our guide to online hearing tests. You can also go to an audiologist and ask them to perform a hearing test. If you see an audiologist, they may be able to give you immediate recommendations for hearing aids specifically designed for your degree of hearing loss. The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association breaks down hearing into seven categories, according to how loud (how many decibels) you need sounds to be before you can hear them. These include:

  • Normal (range of -10 to 15 decibels)
  • Slight (16-25)
  • Mild (26-40)
  • Moderate (41-55)
  • Moderately severe (56-70)
  • Severe (71-90)
  • Profound (91+)

It’s important to know which category characterizes your hearing loss because it will determine your subsequent needs. Most hearing aids sold online are effective in addressing slight to moderate or moderately severe hearing loss, meaning you will most likely have to see an audiologist at a hearing aid center to get hearing aids designed for more advanced hearing loss. Partly for this reason, hearing aids addressing severe and profound hearing loss tend to be more expensive to compensate for the required personal care and advanced technology.

In general, audiologists recommend that you buy two hearing aids together, rather than just one; having assistance in only one ear can stress the parts of the brain tasked with processing sound.

But having two fully functioning hearing aids when you don’t need both of them can also interfere with the sound you receive in your “good ear.” If a hearing test reveals that you have significant hearing loss only in one ear, several companies offer specially designed hearing aids precisely for that situation. Oticon’s CROS series, for instance, addresses moderate to severe single-sided hearing loss by pairing a full hearing aid on one side with an extra receiver on the other.

Budget

Running through all of the factors we discuss here is budget. Advances in technology mean that you can now buy a pair of hearing aids for anywhere from $300 to over $5,000. What you get for such price differences can vary widely. Most hearing aid companies will offer models at different price points, but generally, the more expensive a hearing aid, the more advanced audio quality and features it will have.

The exception to this rule is the online hearing aid company. Because of the structure of direct-to-consumer companies, you may be able to find a hearing aid online for a fraction of the price of a comparable hearing aid sold at a hearing aid center. If you have a tight budget, and are looking for hearing aids under $1,000, you probably want to focus on online retailers.

Generally, insurance companies do not cover hearing aids, but there are exceptions. Be sure to check with your insurance company and see if your plan can help alleviate your hearing aid costs.

Also keep in mind that some sellers allow you to finance your hearing aids. Many online retailers like Lively and MDHearingAid, for instance, offer interest-free financing for one year or more. If you are on a fixed income, or if you don’t have a lot of extra cash saved up, this may be a good option for you.

Buying in person vs. online

Compare the processes

Until relatively recently, the only way to buy hearing aids was to go in person to an audiologist. This process has more steps than buying online and can involve multiple trips to a hearing aid center.

  1. Book an appointment.

  2. Visit an audiologist or hearing aid center.

  3. Take a hearing test.

  4. Buy the hearing aids, based on the audiologist’s recommendations. If you are ordering customized hearing aids, be prepared to wait as the manufacturers make and ship them to the hearing aid center.

  5. Pick up your hearing aids (if you had them ordered).

  6. Make another appointment (or appointments) to adjust the devices as needed.

Faced with that complicated and often expensive process, many companies have taken advantage of the internet and created hearing aids that you can purchase directly online without any in-person visits and often eliminating middleman price markups. The typical process of purchasing a hearing aid online would go as follows:

  1. Go to the company’s website, either prepared to do a hearing test or armed with the results of a previous one.

  2. Choose the product that best suits your needs. Order it to be shipped directly to your home (typically, for free).

  3. Pick up the package and follow the setup instructions. Some companies will walk you through this over the phone or video chat.

  4. Make any adjustments necessary using support provided by the company’s online, video chat, or phone systems. Most companies offer access to trained audiologists, and if you don’t like your hearing aids, many will give you your money back if you return them within 45 days (or more).

Pros and cons of buying online

Buying hearing aids online has distinct advantages and disadvantages. Advantages include:

  • Low cost: hearing aid centers effectively act as middlemen between you and the hearing aid manufacturer. Because of that, you take on some of their costs of doing business like paying for storage space, staff salaries, etc. Plus, they want to make a profit! They pass these costs on to you in higher prices for your hearing aid, as well as appointment costs. But because online hearing aid companies cut out this middleman, they can offer their products at lower prices, often hundreds or even thousands of dollars cheaper.
  • Convenience: You can purchase your hearing aids on your schedule, at any time of day, and can get customer support precisely when you want it. And no repeat trips across town.
  • Customer support: Because these companies realize you are taking a bit of a risk purchasing something you’ve never seen, they usually offer excellent customer support systems. Lively, for example, offers three years of follow-up virtual appointments with a trained audiologist.

Meanwhile, disadvantages include:

  • Lack of customization: Unlike many hearing aids you see at a hearing aid center, hearing aids purchased online aren’t made to fit the specific structure of your ear. As a result, they may be more uncomfortable or liable to fall out.
  • Fewer style options: Most (but not all) companies selling hearing aids online stick to BTE (behind the ear) devices, because they are the simplest, easiest to clean, and most likely to fit your ear. As we discuss further below, BTEs also tend to be the biggest and most visible design, and not all online companies allow you to personalize your hearing aid with color choices. There are exceptions to this. Audicus, for instance, sells RIC (receiver in canal) and CIC (completely in canal) devices, and Eargo offers several ITE (in the ear) options that are practically invisible.
  • Inability to address severe or profound hearing loss in most cases: Most direct-to-consumer hearing aids are only designed to address mild to moderate hearing loss.

Types of hearing aids

Before making an expensive purchase, you’ll want to understand the different types of hearing aids available to you. Although some companies still sell cheaper analog models, nowadays most hearing aids are digital. Their basic components are pretty similar: Most hearing aids include a battery, a microphone that picks up sound, an amplifier that makes the sound louder, and a speaker (or receiver) that transmits the sound to your ear. But where these parts are located varies. Hence, various types of hearing aids, each with its own advantages and disadvantages.

BTE

The cheapest and most common type of hearing aid is the behind-the-ear or BTE device. In BTEs, most of the components are located in a small plastic case behind the ear, and this case has gotten smaller and smaller as technology has improved. The case is connected to an earpiece by a piece of clear tubing.

BTEs have many benefits. A big one is that they cover all degrees of hearing loss, from mild to profound. They are easy to handle for caregivers and people with dexterity issues. Plus, because their components are located outside the ear, BTEs are very easy to clean and aren’t as affected by earwax buildup or moisture as models that go inside the ear. For kids, BTEs are convenient because it’s easy to adjust the size as their ears grow.

Because BTE hearing devices generally have a simpler design, they are more readily available, giving you more options in terms of price, appearance, and purchase method. You can buy a pair of BTE hearing aids online for as little as $248 from Otofonix, or you can purchase a high-end pair from Signia at a hearing aid center for around $2,000 per ear. Many of the mid- to high-range companies also have the option of choosing your color.

The big downside to BTEs is cosmetics. They tend to be the most visible type of hearing aid, and for that reason, some people shy away from them.

ITE

For in-the-ear, or ITE hearing aids, all of the different parts are located inside your ear, specifically, your outer ear. This means they are more susceptible to damage from moisture and ear wax buildup, but they are often less conspicuous than their BTE counterparts. You can usually find ITEs suitable for all degrees of hearing loss.

ITEs typically have to be custom-fit to your ear, which often limits your online purchase options. That said, some direct-to-consumer hearing aid companies like Eargo have taken up the challenge, and they sell ITEs that you can order directly online without a visit to an audiologist.

Canal hearing aids

There are a few styles of hearing aid that fit entirely in the ear canal. These can be seen as a subset of ITEs with specific features that set them apart. Because they are located on the inner part of your ear, in-the-cana, or ITC, hearing aids are really hard to see. Their smaller siblings — completely-in-the-canal (CIC) and invisible-in-the-canal (IIC) hearing aids — are even harder to see. These can be great if you want discretion, but a problem if you don’t have dexterous or careful fingers, or if someone is trying to remove your hearing aids for you.

As a rule, the smaller the hearing aid, the more limitations it presents for advanced technology. This means that CIC and IIC hearing aids are usually only suited for people with mild to moderate hearing loss.

Because these hearing aids are usually custom-made, you typically don’t see these styles available from direct-to-consumer companies. However, Audicus does offer one CIC model, and Eargo’s discreet ITC devices use flexible hairs called petals to hold them in place.

RIC/RITE

Receiver-in-canal (RIC) and receiver in the ear (RITE) hearing aids split the difference between ITEs and BTEs, by putting some components behind the ear and some inside it. The receiver (or speaker), which is in the ear, connects via a small wire to the device’s other components (battery, amplifier, microphone), which sit behind the ear. This wire is delicate, and the receiver inside the ear is susceptible to moisture and earwax, so RICs can easily suffer damage. You can often replace this receiver separately at a hearing aid center, rather than having to send the entire hearing aid back to the manufacturer.

RICs are often more visible than hearing aids that fit entirely inside the ear, but this bigger size means that they offer more advanced technological features. You can usually find RICs fitting all degrees of hearing loss, and some models are available online. RICs tend to be a bit more expensive than BTEs.

Environmental and lifestyle factors

As people wearing hearing aids have different lifestyles, hearing aid manufacturers have responded by creating hearing aids with features suited for different priorities and conditions.

Battery type

The type of battery in your hearing aid will have a huge impact on your experience. Many companies now offer both built-in rechargeable and replaceable batteries, sometimes even in the same model. The advantage of rechargeable batteries is that they save you trips to the store for replacements, and they are more eco-friendly in producing less waste. However, rechargeable batteries tend not to last as long as replaceable ones. Typical rechargeable batteries will last around 24 hours, although some higher-priced hearing aids like the Eargo Max and the Signia Motion approach a week. Replaceable batteries, on the other hand, can last as long as a month, so you don’t have as much daily upkeep.

Keep in mind that no matter what kind of batteries you have, your hearing aids will die sooner if you are streaming audio or connecting them to other devices. Just like with your phone or other battery-powered devices, the more technology you use, the more power they consume.

Portability

Are you someone who frequently is away from home, or even off the grid? Since hearing aids with replaceable batteries last as long as a month, you don’t have to worry about not being able to use them on your week-long camping trip. That same trip can pose a problem for rechargeable hearing aids, as they often can’t survive a single day.

Manufacturers have realized this problem, and some like MDHearingAid and Eargo have responded by offering recharger cases that can power your hearing aids on the go. The portable recharger case for the MDHearingAid Volt+ typically holds enough power for about three charges, while Eargo’s recharger case will last about 5-7 days with daily use. The result is rechargeable hearing aids that can last nearly a week without being near an outlet.

Water resistance

As with all electronics, water is an enemy to hearing aids. But controlling for it can be a bit tricky when it starts raining on your walk, or when you accidentally drop them in the sink while doing dishes; sometimes even sweat can pose a problem. If you’re someone for whom contact with water is likely, you may want to consider buying a water-resistant hearing aid.

Water resistance is measured according to an IP rating. Some companies boast about their water-resistant IPX6 hearing aids, but all this designation really means is that it can resist high-pressure sprays of water, like if your kid sprays you with a hose. If you’re looking for something that can survive submersion in the sink, look for something with at least an IPX7 rating. This rating means that it can be submerged for up to 30 min in up to one meter of water. Audicus even offers IPX8-rated hearing aids, which are protected against total submersion for long periods in water up to three meters deep.

Hearing aids that offer at least an IPX7 rating include most Audicus models, the MDHearingAid Volt+, Oticon Play, and Phonak Audéo Marvel.

Audio Technology

Considering the common goal to rectify hearing loss, there is an amazing variety of features and quality when it comes to the audio technology sported by different hearing aids on the market. Here’s a look at some key available features among budget hearing aids (under $1,000):

  Dual directional mics Feedback cancellation Speech recognition Preset audio settings Bluetooth Customized settings Telecoil
MDHearingAid AIR  
Yes
  4    
Yes
Otofonix Elite       4      
Otofonix Sona       4
Yes
Yes
 
Otofonix Encore
Yes
Yes
  4    
Yes
Otofonix Helix
Yes
    4      
Otofonix Groove
Yes
    4
Yes
Yes
 
MDHearingAid VOLT+
Yes
Yes
  4      
Bose SoundControl
Yes
Yes
  None
Yes
Yes
 
Audicus Dia II
Yes
Yes
Yes
4  
Yes
Yes

Insider Tip: One of Otofonix’s online videos states the Helix has a telecoil feature, but we want you to know that this is inaccurate. The Otofonix website and customer service confirm that it doesn’t.

Audio settings and automatic adaptability

Most hearing aids come with four preset audio settings. (The Bose SoundControl hearing aids are a rare exception with their manually adjustable settings.) Depending on the device and the company, these preset audio settings may be tuned to your specific needs, as determined by your hearing test, or they may be the same for everyone with that hearing aid. Typically, these settings revolve around the different sorts of sound environments you may encounter, and they take into account how loud background noise is and how you are interacting with your environment. For example, MDHearingAid’s AIR has quiet, social, noisy, and restaurant settings.

For many less expensive hearing aid models, these settings are preset and generic. For other devices, like the Audicus Dia II, these settings are preset but tuned to the needs demonstrated on your hearing test. Some more advanced hearing aids, like the Eargo 5, allow you to customize your settings via a Bluetooth-connected app. And some, like Lively’s, even do a combination of customized presets that you can subsequently adjust yourself.

For many hearing aids, you can toggle back and forth between these settings by pressing a button on the device itself or by changing the setting in the app. This can be tricky if you don’t have particularly dexterous fingers, or if the hearing aid sits deeper in your ear.

But more advanced hearing aids have the nifty trick of being able to adjust automatically. This means that you don’t have to worry about adjusting your hearing aids manually when you move from the quiet outdoors to a noisy party.

Noise reduction

Most hearing aids will have some level of background noise reduction. That is, they attempt to reduce irrelevant sounds in the background in order to focus on sound closer at hand, like speech. But different hearing aids will have different levels of sophistication in this regard. You can measure this sophistication by seeing the hearing aid’s decibel (dB) gain reduction. For reference, the Eargo NeoHifi advertises a 17dB gain reduction, compared to a 12dB gain reduction in the Eargo Max. The extra 5dB of reduction from the NeoHifi model means that it can effectively suppress more background noise than the Max.

Directional microphones

Traditional hearing aid technology involved omnidirectional microphones, which can pick up sound equally from all directions. This makes it difficult to distinguish between speech and background noise.

Now, though, many hearing aids have directional microphones that pick up sound from a specific direction. This makes it easier to separate conversation that is happening in front of you from background noise happening behind you. Even more advanced models will have adaptive directional microphones that sense which direction sound is coming from and tune themselves in that direction.

Feedback cancellation

Feedback occurs with hearing aids as a sort of whistling, caused when sound that is supposed to go into your ear instead is picked up by the microphone. This creates a loop of amplification, and often, an irritating whistling or screeching sound. Feedback is extremely common, sometimes caused simply by poorly fitting hearing aids. If you can, you want to buy hearing aids with feedback cancellation to help reduce or eliminate this problem.

Speech recognition

Usually only available in more advanced models, speech recognition technology is a useful feature that allows your hearing aids to distinguish speech from other types of sounds. This allows you to better filter out unnecessary background noise and focus on the conversation at hand.

Other advanced features

Audio quality aside, many hearing aids offer advanced features that greatly increase convenience and quality of life.

Here’s a look at some basic and advanced features among hearing aids $1,000 to $3,000:

  Dual directional mics Feedback cancellation Speech recognition Tinnitus masking Auto adapt function Bluetooth Telecoil Streaming
MDHearingAid Core
Yes
Yes
   
Yes
Yes
   
Audicus Aura  
Yes
           
Audicus Clara
Yes
Yes
Yes
 
Yes
Optional
Yes
Optional
Audicus Wave
Yes
Yes
Yes
 
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Audicus Spirit
Yes
Yes
Yes
 
Yes
Yes
Yes
Optional
Lively 2 Plus
Yes
Yes
Yes
 
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
Eargo Max  
Yes
Yes
         
Eargo Neo Hifi  
Yes
Yes
         
Eargo 5  
Yes
Yes
   
Yes
   

Telecoil

Telecoil is a useful technology that allows your hearing aids to pick up audio being broadcast over another induction loop system. This means that your hearing aids will be able to patch into many audio systems at theaters, auditoriums, and churches, focusing on the system broadcast and reducing background noise. Most cheaper hearing aids don’t have this technology, though the MDHearingAid Air is an exception. When looking for a hearing aid with telecoil technology, look for a rating of T3 or T4.

Bluetooth

Bluetooth technology allows your hearing aids to connect to another Bluetooth-enabled device, typically your phone. Most companies that offer Bluetooth technology designed their hearing aids to work with a unique app, allowing you to change your audio settings simply by making a few taps on your phone.

This makes Bluetooth a huge advantage for people who have difficulty fiddling with tiny buttons on the backs of hearing aids, or who want an easier way to turn them off than opening the battery compartment. That’s probably why this technology is becoming increasingly popular, and you can even find it in some budget hearing aids.

Just because your hearing aid is Bluetooth enabled, however, doesn’t mean that it will be able to stream audio from your phone. In fact, the sole function of Bluetooth on a lot of cheaper models of hearing aid, like the Otofonix Groove, Otofonix Sona, Bose SoundControl, and MDHearing Aid CORE is to allow you to connect with the company’s app.

Streaming

One step beyond Bluetooth is audio streaming. This means that not only can you connect your hearing aids to an app on your smartphone, but you can also use them to listen to the sound playing on your phone, or even your smart TV. This is typically available only on more expensive devices, though there are a few direct-to-consumer companies like Lively and Audicus that feature streaming on some hearing aids.

Remotes

For those who want an easier control mechanism for their hearing aids than a tiny push-button on the back of your ear, but who also don’t want to have to resort to your phone, you have the option of a remote. These remotes sync with your hearing aids, allowing you to easily adjust settings and volume while keeping your phone free for other things.

Remotes often grant additional features. Even if hearing aids are not specifically designed for direct streaming, some companies have designed Bluetooth remotes that, for an additional cost, allow you to add a streaming feature to your hearing aids. The Audicus Clara, for instance, can be controlled via a Bluetooth remote, which allows streaming, or an Audicus classic remote, which allows you to make audio adjustments at the touch of a (much bigger) button.

And even more advanced…

If you’re willing to lay out some extra cash, there are some hearing aids on the market now with amazing convenience features. The Phonak Marvel, for instance, has hands-free calling and conversation transcription, while the Oticon OPN S can connect to your Apple Watch and alert you when there are problems with your hearing aid.

Comparing hearing aid features

Now that you know what sort of features and considerations are out there in the hearing aid market, it’s time to compare hearing aids. In the following graphs, we’ve broken down the specs of some of the top-selling hearing aids, so you can get an idea of what your hearing aid options might be.

Budget hearing aids

The hearing aids detailed in the following charts are all ones you can buy for under $1,000. Not coincidentally (see the discussion of online vs. traditional buying methods above), all of these hearing aids are sold online by direct-to-consumer companies.

With the exception of the Bose SoundControl hearing aids, all these hearing aids offer four preset audio programs. Except for the Audicus Dia II, which tunes these programs to your hearing test, these programs aren’t customized. Most hearing aids at this budget are BTEs (behind the ear) or RICs (receiver in the canal), so you won’t find the most discreet hearing aid types here. Also, don’t count on finding hearing aids to mask your tinnitus, or to fix your severe or profound hearing loss.

Beyond that, though, you do see some different features. You can find Bluetooth and rechargeable models, though they’re not as common. Some hearing aids offer telecoil, though none of these will allow you to stream directly.

  Price (pair) Degree of hearing loss Type Size (inches) Recharge-able Battery life Water resistance (IPX7)
MDHearingAid AIR $400 Mild to mod. severe BTE 1x .25x .5   21-26 days  
Otofonix Apex $248 Mild to moderate BTE 1x.47x.28      
Otofonix Elite $395 Mild to moderate BTE 1.2x.55x.28   6-8 days  
Otofonix Sona $595 Mild to moderate BTE 1.2x.31x.48   5-7 days  
Otofonix Encore $495 Mild to moderate BTE 1.6x.58x.28   6-8 days  
Otofonix Helix $695 Mild to moderate BTE 1.5x.31x.5
Yes
18 hours  
Otofonix Groove $795 Mild to moderate BTE 1.6x.58x.28
Yes
18 hours  
MDHearingAid VOLT+ $600 Mild to mod.severe BTE 1.25x.25x.5
Yes
24-30 hours
Yes
Bose SoundControl $850 Mild to mod.severe RIC 1.25x.25x.5   56 hours  
Audicus Dia II $998 Mild to moderate BTE 1.18x.46x.3   140 hours
Yes

Online Hearing Aids Between $1,000 and $3,000

Once you get to this price point, you start seeing more options in terms of hearing aid style and advanced technology features. In addition to RIC models, you have several ITE options, including the Audicus Aura, which completely disappears in the ear canal. Remember, though, these more discreet models tend not to have advanced features like auto-adaptability and Bluetooth connectivity, so you do sacrifice some functionality.

All of these hearing aids offer four preset audio programs, so a distinguishing factor now becomes whether the hearing aid automatically adjusts between them. The standouts here in this regard are Audicus and Lively, which also tailor the preset settings to your hearing test. You also get new possibilities in terms of connectivity in this category. Several models offer Bluetooth, telecoil, and streaming capabilities, and the Eargo 5 is unusual in offering Bluetooth connectivity in a discrete ITC style.

  Price (pair) Degree of hearing loss Type Size (inches) Rechargeable Battery life Water resistance (IPX7)
MDHearingAid Core $1,000 Mild to mod. severe BTE 1.375x.2.5x.5   5-6 days  
Audicus Aura $1,398 Mild to moderate CIC 7x.4x.3   105 hours  
Audicus Clara $1,398 Mild to severe RIC 1x.4x.28   160 hours
Yes
Audicus Wave $1,798 Mild to severe RIC 1.1x.46x.3 Optional 18 hours
Yes
Audicus Spirit $2,798 Mild to severe RIC 1.2x.48x.34
Yes
18 hours
Yes
Lively $1,200-$1,600 Mild to severe RIC 1.06x.5x.31 Optional 30 hours  
Eargo Max $1,450 Mild to moderate ITC .72x.37x.27
Yes
16 hours  
Eargo Neo Hifi $1,900 Mild to moderate ITC .76x.27x.47
Yes
16 hours  
Eargo 5 $2,450 Mild to moderate ITC .70x.27x.27
Yes
16 hours  

Why you should trust us

At Innerbody Research, we extensively test the health products and services we review. All told, our team has spent hundreds of hours testing and researching online hearing aid companies, as well as your alternatives, to provide an accurate, unbiased analysis of how the products and services compare, free of marketing jargon and gimmicks.

Over the past two decades, Innerbody Research has helped tens of millions of readers make more informed decisions to live healthier lifestyles. We evaluate the service based on adherence to quality, the latest medical evidence and health standards, and a simple question: would we buy the product or service ourselves if it weren’t part of our job, and would we recommend it to family and friends?

Additionally, like all health-related content on this website, this review was thoroughly vetted by one or more members of our Medical Review Board for accuracy.

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